..

66 Million Trees are Dead in the Sierra Nevada Forest

Pine trees killed by bark beetles.

Pine trees killed by bark beetles. Little York Close cul-de sac

I’ve noticed with great alarm the number of trees dying from the drought and beetle infestation here in Nevada County  It seems like every day, while driving around the county, I see another group of pine trees dying or dead.

There is a small about 1,000 foot long cul-de-sac near my house. I counted 27 pine trees dead or dying in that cul-de-sac.   According to various sources  we have 66 million trees that are dead from the drought and the number is growing. Pine beetles of different varieties are to blame and the principal species which are responsible are: mountain pine beetle, fir engraver beetle, western pine beetle, Jeffrey pine beetle and pine engraver beetles.

 

Mountain pine beetle, about the size of a grain of rice.

Mountain pine beetle, about the size of a grain of rice.

The following is an excerpt from the National Forest Service

The U.S. Forest Service today announced that it has identified an additional 26 million trees dead in California since October 2015. These trees are located in six counties across 760,000 acres in the southern Sierra Nevada region of the state, and are in addition to the 40 million trees that died statewide from 2010 to October 2015, bringing the total to at least 66 million dead trees. Four consecutive years of severe drought in California, a dramatic rise in bark beetle infestation and warmer temperatures are leading to historic levels of tree die-off.

“Tree dies-offs of this magnitude are unprecedented and increase the risk of catastrophic wildfires that puts property and lives at risk,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “While the fire risk is currently the most extreme in California because of the tree mortality, forests across the country are at risk of wildfire and urgently need restoration requiring a massive effort to remove this tinder and improve their health. Unfortunately, unless Congress acts now to address how we pay for firefighting, the Forest Service will not have the resources necessary to address the forest die-off and restore our forests. Forcing the Forest Service to pay for massive wildfire disasters out of its pre-existing fixed budget instead of from an emergency fund like all other natural disasters means there is not enough money left to do the very work that would help restore these high mortality areas. We must fund wildfire suppression like other natural disasters in the country.”

Between 2010 and late 2015, Forest Service aerial detection surveys found that 40 million trees died across California – with nearly three quarters of that total succumbing to drought and insect mortality from September 2014 to October 2015 alone. The survey identified approximately 26 million additional dead trees since the last inventory in October, 2015. The areas surveyed in May covered six southern Sierra counties including Fresno, Kern, Madera, Mariposa, Tuolumne and Tulare. Photos and video of the May survey are available on the Forest Service multimedia webpage.

Help keep this website going

Contact us: O’Dell Realty
530-263-1091

 

 

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

A Near Death Experience And Lessons Learned

Tom-Browning

Tom-Browning

On August 11, 2014, while working on a fire in the Klamath National Forest, Tom Browning and two others were forced to take refuge in fire shelters while the fire burned over them. Tom, a retired Fire Battalion Chief, shared this near death incident on Tuesday night with more than 20 FFA and 4H students from Bear River and Nevada Union high schools as part of the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation’s Speaker Series. The series brings business education – through access to business leaders, life experiences, and leadership tips – to local high school students.

When faced with an adverse or dangerous situation, Browning’s advice to the students is to “stay calm.  You can’t think when you panic or are overwhelmed. Being calm is contagious.”

Browning has more than 40 years of firefighting experience, including 34 years with the City of Grass Valley Fire Department. He retired as a Battalion Chief in 2011. Since his retirement, he has been a member of the North San Juan Fire Protection District, where he serves as volunteer Battalion Chief.  He is also a member of Nor-Cal Team II, a federal Inter Agency Incident Management Team, whose responsibility is to help manage large wildland fires on federal responsibility lands.

Browning is a sixth generation Nevada County resident, and has served as past president of the Nevada County Livestock Producers and the Nevada County Farm Bureau; and is a current board member and past president of the Nevada County Fair Board. He holds his AA degree in Administration of Justice and a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management.

In sharing leadership and life experience advice, Browning emphasized to the students that they should “focus on education and learn as much as they can; experience and learn from life’s lessons; be ethical by doing the right thing even when no one is looking; never give up; and never stop learning.”

The Fairgrounds Foundation’s speaker series, which began in October, featured six speakers. Students had an opportunity to hear about the speaker’s career path, how they achieved their goals, insight regarding their area of expertise, and an opportunity for questions. The series, sponsored by Sandy Ballou of California Outdoor Properties, will start up again in October and high school students are invited to attend.

About the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation: The Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation’s mission is to support and improve the community’s Fairgrounds, and to support youth in agriculture. For more information about the Fairgrounds Foundation, or to become a member, visit NevadaCountyFair.com/foundation/.

Help keep this blog going
Contact ODell Realty

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

John Paye, Former NFL Player and Super Bowl Champion Speaks at Nevada County Fairgrounds

 

 On Thursday night, John Paye, former San Francisco 49er and Super Bowl Chamption, spoke to local 4H and FFA students as part of the Fairgrounds Foundation's speaker series. This monthly series provides business advice, tips and leadership experience to local high school students.

On Thursday night, John Paye, former San Francisco 49er and Super Bowl Chamption, spoke to local 4H and FFA students as part of the Fairgrounds Foundation’s speaker series. This monthly series provides business advice, tips and leadership experience to local high school students.

 

John Paye, former NFL player for the San Francisco 49ers and Super Bowl champion,
shares life-experiences and successes with local youth 

“Be passionate about what you are doing, put in the extra work, and be consistent.” This is the message of success that John Paye, a former NFL player for the 49ers and Super Bowl champion, shared with local youth on Thursday evening.

Paye addressed FFA and 4H students from Bear River, Nevada Union and Placer high schools, as part of the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation’s Speaker Series, which brings business education – through access to business leaders, life experiences, and leadership tips – to high school students. Paye served as the fifth speaker in the series.

During high school, Paye was voted USA Today’s High School Football Player of the Year. He found a home at Stanford, and was a four-year starter for the Cardinals. He was named All-Pac Ten and All-American while also playing as a starter on Stanford’s basketball team for three years. After his college career, Paye was acquired by the San Francisco 49ers, where he played for three seasons serving as backup to Joe Montana from 1987-1988.  Paye was part of the 49ers offense during their 1988 Championship Season, ultimately going on to win Super Bowl XIX.

Paye shared with students his experience in sports, including playing baseball with Barry Bonds, basketball with Michael Jordan, and football with Joe Montana and Jerry Rice. He also shared his childhood memories of the Nevada County Fair, which he continues to visit each year.

Beyond the field for the past 15 years, Paye has worked throughout the west coast educating youth on the importance self-empowerment, saying no to drugs and alcohol, and staying in school.   He reminded the students the importance of staying focused. “Stay on task and don’t get distracted.  Staying focus will help you succeed.”

The Fairgrounds Foundation’s speaker series continues through May.  Students have an opportunity to hear about the speaker’s career path, how they achieved their goals, insight regarding their area of expertise, and an opportunity for questions. The final speaker in this series will be Tom Browning, retired Fire Battalion Chief and current Fairgrounds Board member. The series is sponsored by Sandy Ballou of California Outdoor Properties.

About the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation: The Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation’s mission is to support and improve the community’s Fairgrounds, and to support youth in agriculture. For more information about the Fairgrounds Foundation, or to become a member, visit NevadaCountyFair.com/foundation/.

Help keep this blog going
Contact John O’Dell Real Estate broker
For all your real estate needs

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

The Wines of Basilicata

Picture courtesy of Zenith Holidays.http://www.zenithholidays.co.uk/italy/basilicata/

Picture courtesy of Zenith Holidays. http://www.zenithholidays.co.uk/italy/basilicata/

By Judy Pinegar

Basilicata, in southern Italy, is a region whose name crops up only in wine circles. It is home to just four Denominazione di Origine Controllata  DOC’s, (certified growing areas) which collectively cover only two bottles in every hundred produced here.

Winemaking in Basilicata dates back over a thousand years. While in central and northern Italy it was the Etruscans and Romans who pioneered local winemaking, in the south this task was largely undertaken by seafaring Greeks.  Basilicata was also influenced by the Byzantines, who ruled the area during two distinct periods in both the 6th and 9th centuries and gave the region its current name. (from Greek basilikos, meaning prince and governor).

It was during the Middle Ages that Aglianico (then known as Ellenico) took its place as the leading wine grape variety – although recent theories lean towards the introduction of the grape (known as vino de llanos, or wine of the plains) under Aragonese rule in the late Middle Ages.

Compared to the rest of Italy, the total wine production in Basilicata is very small; less than 500,000 hectoliters, of which only 3% comes under the DOC designation.  The main area for viticulture lies in the heart of  the fertile Vulture Massif in the north, located around extinct volcano of Mount Vulture on volcanic soils.

Although the mountainous terrain and harsh weather makes vine-growing a challenge, this area still enjoys an abundance of sunshine throughout the growing season and cool temperatures around harvest, thanks to the mild currents from the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west.  In this hilly territory the local variety, Alianico del Vulture, reigns, producing quality wines which exhibit fine aromas and flavors.

There are some very pleasant examples of Moscato, and some superb Malivasia, the best of which come the Vulture zone and the eastern Bradano Valley.  Primitivo, Sangiove and Montepulciano also do particularly well, as does Bombino Nero.

The Aglianico del Vulture wine, but expands further afield to the plains of Materia where it is used in Vino da Tavola wines.

Judy is a retired education administrator and dietitian, now enjoying writing for a living, who lives in  Loomis, California, where she grows fruits, vegetable and grapes and makes award winning home wine.

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation to Host Cioppino Feed

horse-statue-at-fairgrounds

February 11,2016

Join the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation at its sixth annual All-You-Can-Eat Cioppino Feed on Saturday, March 5 in Ponderosa Hall at the Nevada County Fairgrounds. Doors open at 5 pm, and dinner service begins at 6 pm.

For the event, the chefs will create and serve Arnie Romanello’s special 100-year-old recipe for all to enjoy. Dinner includes antipasto, all-you-can-eat Cioppino, salad and garlic bread.  A pasta dish will be available for those who do not prefer Cioppino, but want to attend the event. A no-host bar will be available, and there will be a silent dessert auction and a live auction.

Tickets are $40 per person. If you’d like to purchase a table for 8, it is $400 and includes two bottles of wine.   Tickets are available by visiting the Nevada County Fairgrounds, calling the Fair Office at (530) 273-6217, or downloading an order form at NevadaCountyFair.com/foundation.

Proceeds from the event will benefit the Nevada County Fairgrounds Foundation and its mission of supporting and improving the community’s Fairgrounds, and supporting youth in agriculture.

For more information about the Cioppino Feed or the Foundation, visit NevadaCountyFair.com or call the (530) 273-6217.

John O’Dell
ODell Realty
(530) 263-1091

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

The Ghost Town of Basilicata

Picture courtesy of Sometimes Interesting “weird, forgotten or sometimes interesting things”

Picture courtesy of Sometimes Interesting “weird, forgotten or sometimes interesting things”

Craco is the southern Italian hill town located Basilicata, about 25 miles inland from the Gulf of Taranto at the instep of the “boot” of Italy. The medieval village of Craco is typical of the hill towns of the region with mildly undulating hills with the lands surrounding it sown with wheat.  During the mid-Twentieth Century recurring earthquakes began to take a toll on the town until between 1959 and 1972, when the village was almost totally destroyed by a series of landslides.

In 1922 over 1,300 Crachesi left to settle in North America because the poor agricultural conditions created desperate times and the land was not producing enough for the people. Craco was doomed. Now, Craco is uninhabited. Starting in 1963, the 1,800 remaining inhabitants were gradually transferred to a valley in a locality called Craco Peschiera.

But, the Craco Society in New York, founded in May 2007 is a non-profit organization to preserve the culture, traditions and history of Craco. Two visits to the site have been made by society members, and as of March 2014, the organization has grown to 466 members. They are currently working on projects to meet future goals.

These goals include: expanding their membership to reach the many Crachesi descendants worldwide in an attempt to share the history, culture and traditions of the town. They are planning the 7th annual Crachesi del Nord America Reunion next summer, and the celebration of San Vincenzo’s 113th year in New York in October, 2014.

They plan to continue to work to support the preservation and renovation of Craco from the ravages of nature, obtaining historical and genealogical records and establishing even closer bonds with the residents of Craco Peschiera. They invite anyone with a special place in their heart for this ancient, historic town to join them in their mission. Contact them at: http://www.thecracosociety.org/.

By Judy Pinegar
Judy is a writer for numerous publications

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

Online Safety Basics for the Holidays And Year Around

hacker-potential

Photo courtesy of www.telegraph.co.uk

With the holidays coming, the wave of the tech crooks are out in force. Here are some tips to protect yourself.

  • Shop only on secure websites. One indicator of a secure website is the presence of a yellow padlock icon in the browser bar. Another indicator is “https” (as compared to “http” with no “s” at the end) in the web address.
  • Avoid making online purchases in public Wi-Fi hotspots, such as a coffee shop, which can put your credit card numbers and other information at risk.
  • Never send sensitive personal or financial information, such as a Social Security or bank account number, through e-mail. Legitimate companies will not ask you to do so because this is not a secure way to transfer sensitive information.
  • The internet has many legitimate websites that offer vacation homes. However, scammers also put listings on vacation websites. If the price is too good to be true, it usually is.
  • Scammers can use phone apps and games to steal your personal information. Do not download apps unless they are from a known source and have third-party reviews that verify their legitimacy.
  • If you are receiving text messages on your cell phone saying you have won a prize or gift card, do not click on the link in the message – it is most likely a scam and may install a virus on your phone.
  • Consider implementing a two-step protection process for your email account, which pairs “something you know,” like a password or PIN, with “something you have,” like your cellphone or a physical token. This adds an extra layer of security to prevent access to your personal information.  For example, after inputting your password, you will then receive a text on your cellphone, giving you a one-time-use code to log into your email account.  Information on how to set up this two-step protection strategy for each of the following email providers can be found here:

Outlook  http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/two-step-verification-faq

Gmail – http://www.google.com/landing/2step/

Yahoo –  https://help.yahoo.com/kb/account/two-step-verification-extra-account-security-sln5013.html

Source: Attorney General of California

Help keep this blog going
Call or write today for all your real estate needs
John J. O’Dell Realtor® GRI
O’Dell Realty
(530) 263-1091
BRE#00669941

 

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

Enter Nevada County Fair Gingerbread HOuse Contest!

People's choice Kathy Kinney 2014

People’s choice Kathy Kinney 2014

Submit your entry form by Friday, November 20, 2015 

Now is the time for holiday bakers to think about the creation of a magical Gingerbread House to enter into the 13th annual Gingerbread House Competition at the Country Christmas Faire, held November 27, 28, and 29 at the Nevada County Fairgrounds in Grass Valley. Houses, bungalows, cottages, and castles fashioned from spicy gingerbread will be displayed for holiday shoppers to enjoy during the Thanksgiving weekend festivities.

Competitors may enter any of the many categories, including children, teens, adults, special needs, families, and groups.  There’s even a category for children under 8 years of age who want to enter a house made by a kit. All those who enter a Gingerbread House exhibit will receive two free passes to the Country Christmas Faire.

Ribbons are given to all winners, and the Best of Show winner will receive $100. A special gift basket from Tess’ Kitchen Store will also be awarded to the Best of Show winner and the People’s Choice Award winner.

Entry forms must be received at the Fairgrounds between now and Friday, November 20 by 4 pm. The actual gingerbread house entry must be delivered to the Fairgrounds on Tuesday, November 24 between the hours of 11 am – 6 pm at Ponderosa Hall.  The cost is $2 to enter, and all Gingerbread House exhibitors will receive two free passes to the Country Christmas Faire.

Entry forms and a complete list of rules can be picked up at the Fairgrounds office on McCourtney Road, or downloaded from the Fair’s website at www.NevadaCountyFair.com.

The Country Christmas Faire features talented artisans who fill the Fairgrounds exhibit buildings with quality hand-made crafts and unique gifts, so you can get all your holiday shopping done in one location. Visitors to the Faire will enjoy strolling live entertainment, festival foods, wagon rides, and a community bon-fire. Santa Claus will be on hand to greet children, so bring your camera to get that special photo. Santa will be available each day until an hour before closing time.

Free babysitting will be offered by Girl Scouts of the Northern Mines Service Unit so parents can drop off their children while they enjoy holiday shopping. Errand Elves from Clear Creek School will be available to assist shoppers throughout the event.

The 31st annual Country Christmas Faire begins Friday, November 27, and runs through Sunday, November 29.  The hours are 10 am – 5 pm on Friday and Saturday; and 10 am – 4 pm on Sunday. Admission is $4 for adults, and free to children 12 and under. Parking is free. On Sunday, if you bring a can of food, you’ll receive $1 off admission. All food donated is collected by the Grass Valley Elks and used in their Christmas baskets that they hand out in December.

The Nevada County Fairgrounds is located at 11228 McCourtney Road in Grass Valley. For more information, visit www.NevadaCountyFair.com or call (530) 273-6217.

Help keep this blog going
Call or write today for all your real estate needs
John J. O’Dell Realtor® GRI
O’Dell Realty
(530) 263-1091
BRE#00669941

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

Nevada County Fairgrounds Begins Search for 2016 Fair Theme

2015 Theme

2015 Theme 

Submit the winning theme and win a prize package to the 2016 Nevada County Fair 

The Nevada County Fairgrounds is hosting a contest to find the winning theme for the 2016 Fair. Do you have a catchy or fun theme that you think would be perfect for the 2016 Nevada County Fair?

Visit the Fair’s website at NevadaCountyFair.com and submit a theme idea that you think would be perfect for the Fair. If the theme you submit is selected, you win. The winner will receive a 2016 Nevada County Fair package that includes two free admission tickets for each day of the Fair, a 5-day parking pass for the Fair, and ride coupons.

Submissions must be five words or less and no trade-marked themes will be considered. The contest runs now through November 5, 2015. For those without access to the Internet, entry forms are available at the Nevada County Fairgrounds office, or information can be mailed to the Fairgrounds at P.O. Box 2687, Grass Valley, CA  95945. No phone entries will be accepted.

Once the winning theme is selected, there will be a contest to design artwork or submit a photo to illustrate the theme. Each year, the theme and artwork appear on advertisements, buttons, posters, banners and the Fair’s website to promote the Fair.

The 2016 Nevada County Fair is scheduled for August 10 – 14. For a complete list of contest rules or information, visit NevadaCountyFair.com or call (530) 273-6217.

Help keep this blog going
Call or write today for all your real estate needs
John J. O’Dell Realtor® GRI
O’Dell Realty
(530) 263-1091
BRE#00669941

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn

2015 29th Annual Draft Horse Classic Awards Announced Nevada County Fair

“Winner of the Ultimate Hitch Competition – Wayne Wareing of Wareing Shires, based out of Blackfoot, Idaho – performs at the 2015 Draft Horse Classic.”

“Winner of the Ultimate Hitch Competition – Wayne Wareing of Wareing Shires, based out of Blackfoot, Idaho – performs at the 2015 Draft Horse Classic.”

Awards for the 29th annual Draft Horse Classic, held September 24 – 27 at the Nevada County Fairgrounds in Grass Valley, have been announced.  Albert Cleve of Farmington, Missouri, judged the Draft Horse competitions and halter show. Dwight Gilbert from Nevada was the judge of the pulling contest; and Robbie Mederos from Danville, California was the horseshoe competition judge.

More than 50 Draft Horse exhibitors – traveling from California, Oregon, Colorado, and Idaho – competed for approximately $30,000 in premium awards. The competitions took place during six performances over the four-day event.

The winner of the Ultimate Hitch competition was Wayne Wareing of Wareing Shires, from Blackfoot, Idaho.

Audrey Popoff of Unhitched Ranch, from Colton, CA was recognized as the outstanding lady driver, accumulating high points to win the Susan Parnell High Point Perpetual Award.

The Teamster of the Year Award was presented to Deb Luis, an honor bestowed upon her by the voting of her fellow teamsters. Luis is from Debzdrafts in Marysville, CA. The Andy Amsbaugh Teamster Award went to Steve Smith of Quail Creek Percherons, Carmichael, CA; and Dakota Shinn of Shinn Ranch Percherons, Placerville, CA, won the Youth of the Show award.

The Overall Supreme Champion horse, GT Bold Adventure, is owned by Thiel Family Percherons of Pleasant Grove, CA, and shown by Jason Bexon.  The Grand Champion Stallion, Rolling Acres Tyrane, is also owned by Thiel Family Percherons.

The Grand Champion Mare, Noodle, is owned by Top Hand Ranch and shown by Crystal Newborn of Elverta, CA.

The winner in the 2015 Edward Martin Perpetual Horseshoeing Competition was Lance Yohe of Elk Grove, CA.

At the Harvest Fair, with more than 800 items entered, the Best of Division in the Scarecrows went to Sierra View Manor in Grass Valley; and the People’s Choice award for the Scarecrows went to Nicholas Husak of Grass Valley.

A complete list of 2015 Draft Horse Classic awards, as well as all the Harvest Fair winners, is on the Nevada County Fairgrounds’ website at NevadaCountyFair.com. 

The 2016 Draft Horse Classic is scheduled for September 22 – 25. Tickets will go on sale on May 2, 2016.  Visit NevadaCountyFair.com for more information.

Help keep this blog going
Call or write today for all your real estate needs
John J. O’Dell Realtor® GRI
O’Dell Realty
(530) 263-1091
BRE#00669941

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • Facebook
  • TwitThis
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • email
  • Reddit
  • MySpace
  • RSS
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks
  • Blogosphere News
  • FriendFeed
  • Google
  • muti
  • LinkedIn